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A Few Writing Excerpts From Our LCS Students

Lakeland Christian School

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Lakeland Christian School

One of the core values of LCS is the belief that we are partnering with parents in the Christian education of their children. We believe that mutual respect, communication and involvement by all partners is essential for success of our mission.LCS is a school. We believe that being a Christian school and being a top-flight academic institution should not be mutually exclusive. On the contrary, we take the mandate of Colossians 3:23 that calls us to strive to be the best. We provide a variety of rigorous, engaging, academic and co-curricular activities that enable students to identify and express the full range of their unique gifts and abilities.

It’s so great to see how our students are growing and learning! Here are a few writing assignments completed by secondary students:

Writing by: Lily Harrington – Mrs. Henson 10th Grade English

Lily Harrington

Many writers, whether consciously or subconsciously, influence their readers with their personal beliefs through their writing. Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, is no exception and illustrates the main ideals of Romanticism in her book. Many principles of Romanticism are seen through Shelley’s writing, and, although her beliefs share commonalities with the Biblical worldview, in contrast, the Biblical Worldview proves Romanticism is lacking in truth.

     Imago Dei, the idea that every person is created in the image of God, is a very meaningful belief of Christianity and, by omission, Shelley proves that Romanticism is not concerned with how others are treated. Victor’s creature pleads for compassion with Victor saying, “I ought to be thy Adam…”, which highlights the Biblical idea, Imago Dei. (72) The creature is trying to convince Victor to feel some responsibility for the wretched life the creature has now because he was his creator. Victor’s creature continues to explain how instead of being his beloved creation, he has turned into a fallen angel who has strayed from Victor’s intended path for it. The Bible clearly states, “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27, ESV). This specific verse is what Christians base the teaching of Imago Dei on. It explains how God created man in his own image and how each person is perfect and unique in his or her own way. Throughout the story, Shelley, by failing to respect every unique creature, illustrates that Christianity, through the Imago Dei, is a religion concerned with putting others before oneself.

     Both worldviews have something tangible to turn to in difficult times. Victor escapes reality and runs to the “sublime and magnificent scenes” that he describes nature as in order to feel “the greatest consolation” from the massive problems awaiting him at home (69). Shelley, as a Romantic, portrays her characters as believers in Romanticism, which is obvious here. Victor views nature as an escape from his problems and a consolation for his mind and soul. However the Bible firmly states, “The Lord your God is God of gods and Lord of lords, the great, the mighty, and the awesome God, who is not partial and takes no bribe” (Deuteronomy 10:17, ESV). This passage firmly states that God is above all others and is Lord over all. This greatly contrasts with the worship-like way Romantics view nature. The Bible truly proves God’s dominance over all creation in Isaiah where is says, “To whom then will you liken God, or what likeness compare with him?” (40:28, ESV). This firmly emphasizes that God is like no other and has ultimate power over everyone and everything on earth. God also has the power to not only comfort the suffering, but also help these people. Through the Bible, it is obvious that God is superior to nature because God not only provides comfort to his suffering children, but also provides a solution to this suffering.


Writing by: Emmylou Varnum – Mrs. Henson 10th Grade English

Emmylou Varnum

Without love and friendship in one’s life, a void is created that assumes the form of vengeful actions. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein portrays Victor and his creation at odds against one another, as Victor abandons the creature, leaving him in want of a relationship, the creature rebels against humanity. With friendship in his life, the monster would have become a contributing member of society, but due to his rejection and consuming alienation, he becomes a menace to everyone around him. 

The monster never would have caused any trouble if he had been cared for by his creator. The monster is inflicted with crippling pain because Victor “had abandoned [him], and in the bitterness of [his] heart [he] cursed him” (242). The vindictive behavior of the monster is a result of his abandonment from his creator. If Victor had taken responsibility for his creature, the creature would have learned to thrive in human society. The monster longs for a relationship with someone, but still he “was dependent on none and related to none” (237). Victor has deserted the monster without any explanation, so as a result, the monster is forced to live life on his own. He has no one else in the world to help him; furthermore, he becomes filled with tremendous confusion and pain. Before the monster’s isolation had consumed him, he “was benevolent; [his] soul glowed with love and humanity; but [he was] alone, miserably alone?” (179). The monster is born a humble creature with a kind heart, but over time, his solitude consumes him, and causes him to become bitter and angry. Without someone to share his life with, the joy and wonder he had once seen in the world departs. The lack of love and care in the monster’s life results in the bitter evacuation of the admiration he once had for the world and the people in it. 


Writing by: Hannah Haverkamp – Dr. McNaughton 6th Grade English

Hannah Haverkamp

Certain Jobs That Would Be Fun To Try 

     Have you ever thought that the world was full of boring jobs and no enjoyable ones? Well, you’re wrong! There are plenty of fun jobs out there, just simply waiting to be tried! Three jobs that I would for sure try would be a barista, a babysitter, and a substitute teacher.

     To begin, the first job that I would like to try would be a barista. One reason I would like to be a barista would be, as a barista, you get to create your own personal drinks and mix them together to make a one-of-a-kind specialty. I can just imagine how fun it would be to invent and serve my hand-made drinks to appreciative customers! Also, being a barista, you get to see people smile, and you get to make people happy when you’re serving them. Of course, everyone knows how people are without their morning coffee, so a barista can give a great start to anyone’s work-day. To add, being a barista is an effortless job — pretty much all you do is wipe tables and make delicious coffee. Oh! Did I mention that you can get free perks, rewards, and food at the restaurant you’re working at? I would get free coffee every day! Forget the customers, I’m all in for the food!

     Secondly, another job I would definitely enjoy would be being a babysitter. The first reason why I would love babysitting is, you get to have fun. Being a babysitter, you can have fun with kids of all ages! I love babies, kids, and toddlers, and I love being able to work with all of them. To add, a job as a babysitter gives you the freedom to take walks with the kids, play games with them, and befriend them! Speaking of freedom, you can do whatever you want when you babysit. If the kid is taking a nap, you can play on your phone, as we all know everyone clearly enjoys that. There’s more to it besides playing around with your phone or the kids. Being a babysitter builds your character, it makes you responsible, builds trust in your parents and the family you’re working for, and even more teaches you love. Watch a child. Do you see how much they love you, how much they befriend you? I know you’re supposed to be the role model as the babysitter, but really in the big picture there is so much to learn, and so much more to it.

     Next, the third job I would like to try would be a substitute teacher. One reason I would like my job to be a substitute, is because it isn’t a full term job. You don’t need to wake up super early on that Monday, head off to the dreaded office, in uniform, with your boss who is not thrilled with last week’s presentation. Being a substitute you work only so many days in a school year, and you get to have options as well. You can work with those adorable preschoolers one day, but if you get sick and tired of singing the ABC song, and if your fingers are about to fall off from snapping your fingers so much at that one restless kid, you can work in the older grades such as middle school. To add, another advantage of being a substitute is how worry free you can be. All you have to do is teach things you’ve already learned! Did I mention, as the subbing teacher you can play learning games with the kids? There’s so much good and fun that you can do as a substitute, as well as so much good comes out from subbing.     To conclude, there are many, many jobs out there that you could ever wish to try. A barista, a babysitter, and a substitute teacher are just a few of the jobs you could try. Oh my! I just remembered I had a job interview tomorrow! Would you write my recommendation letter?

Special thanks to Mrs. Henson and Dr. McNoughton for providing these!